The Need for Authoritarianism

Another great article from Testis Gratus

Ad Calvariam

I CULT FRANCISCO FRANCO  DEL LIBRO A GOLPE DE SABLE DE GABRIEL CARDONA

[First posted at WCR: 10 September 2016]

The propagation of Enlightenment philosophy led to an obsession with liberty and freedom in Western Europe. This is how we ended up with Classical Liberalism in its various forms. I should not need to point out the flaws of Liberalism for anyone reading this. Certain Liberal (in the original sense of the word) tendencies remain in right-wing political theory, even in the “alt-right” with the ever-increasing Liberalism for Whites™ crowd. However, this has caused some on the “right,” like the contingent of libertarians and anarcho-capitalists, to react with hostility toward absolutism and centralized government.

In a previous article, I highlighted Juan Donoso Cortes‘ theory of repression and the need for internal discipline through religion, specifically Christianity. Liberalism fails to address the issue of governing a degenerate populace and, indeed, contributes to such a problem. In my article, I quoted Cortes, appropriately…

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15 thoughts on “The Need for Authoritarianism

  1. But yet authoritarianism and censorship are such horrors when done by the Left. I prefer a more consistent ideology than that of suppression. It’s also worth noting that the backlash from Franco is much of the reason that Spain is in the mess that it is.

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      1. I don’t think that’s fair argument. One can certainly complain if the left oppresses the right. My issues isn’t with oppression but with WHAT is being oppressed. But, atlas, I’m not exactly an authoritarian of the modern variety, just thought this post was an interesting perspective. I prefer, nay, believe, medievalism is the way to go. In the end, we need a return to faith over anything.

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    1. I wouldn’t despise Leftist authoritarianism and censorship because its oppressive, but because Leftism is a wicked.

      Just like I don’t despise Mohammedanism because it’s a religion, but because it is false.

      Spain is in the position it’s in for a number of reasons, but WRT Franco, it’s not because Franco came to power but rather because Franco failed. And still, Spain’s poverty is a blessing in disguise, as it is preventing them for having to deal with huge amounts of immigrants like other countries, which is leading to widespread conflict.

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      1. That was a point I was attempting to make. Censorship and such isn’t so much an issue for me as much as leftist censorship. Social Matter had a good article on why one shouldn’t be against all Political Correctness, only leftist orthodoxy. For example I think it should be a social stigma and speak blasphemous or vain things about our God. That would be political correctness

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      2. To say that Franco failed raises the question what it is that failed in. It is certain that he failed to understand that Spain, while one country, consists of many nations (as indeed do most civilized countries), and because of this his policy of suppression was deeply flawed. In the wisdom of St. Stephan the Great we find “a country of one single language and one set of customs is weak and vulnerable…” and Franco’s policy of cultural, mind you not his moral policy, but his cultural policy of censorship (and oppression) proved this quite true. Any state organized along Francoist lines, despite good intent, makes traditional restoration for practical purposes impossible.

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      1. If I may weigh in, I think the Imperial Traditionalist is making the point that the article makes too much of a case for the kind of Centralist Absolutism that “Dictatorship” of Francoist variety falls into. Franco, despite all the good that he did, suppressed legitimate and reasonable differences in favor of a centralized state, and at the same time isolated the Carlist Legitimists, leading to the fragmentation of Spain his measures intended to avoid. Opposite of this example would be Chancellor Dollfuss, who ruled within a legal framework established in the Old Empire, suppressing only as much as was reasonable and necessary, always in anticipation of the return of the legitimate Emperor. Similar is the understanding of Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn that while certain freedoms were unreasonable in times of crisis, and could be suspended, Absolutism was not justified by this.

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      2. Alright fellows. You both make a valid point and I’ll have to say you have convinced me. Due to my smaller depth of knowledge of Franco’s Spain I wasn’t able to make that connection, however from what you have said and things I’ve read in the past I was aware that Franco did e d up botching up a few things. I prefer to not have fascism or autocratic dictatorship, as TG notes in his article, it becomes tiresome for the ruler and the ruled. I found it to an interesting fm perspective and I do see where he is coming from. But I also see the points both of you are making. Granted it is a theoretical piece but does make one think. Will we have a revival of Faith? Or will despotism take control in an attempt to regain order? After all, God gives us the rulers we deserve.

        I thank both of you for your input and do value it. Your input is always welcome.

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      3. You’re right that it is an interesting perspective, and has valid insights, such as you mention with the necessity of a revival of Faith. However, I would say it is not enough to see where something comes from, one also has to see where it is going, which I’m sure you agree. Depostism can have its good effects in the establishment of order, but all too often it imposes its own order on that which it cannot lawfully order, and thus should be avoided if possible.

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      4. I would never say that Franco was perfect. But, his methods are most likely necessary for any sort of future restoration. European monarchies are not simply going to come back tomorrow. And so, Franco serves as a model, though certainly flawed. He seemed to be an opportunist rather than an ambitious reactionary or anything like that. Absolutism is a valid conductor for a larger and more extensive revival, but it grows more unstable the longer it lasts, which is why there needs to be an achievable goal in sight so the government can eventually release its hold over the country. As I see it, there aren’t any other options, at least not at the present.

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